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Custom date time format in Oracle SQL Developer?
 
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From Oracle SQL Developer's menu go to Tools -- Preferences. From the Preferences dialog, select Database -- NLS from the left panel. From the list of NLS parameters, enter DD-MON-RR HH24:MI:SS or for 24-Hour, DD-MON-YY HH24:MI:SS Or just for an active session use below instead. alter SESSION set NLS_DATE_FORMAT = 'required_date_format' i.e. alter SESSION set NLS_DATE_FORMAT = 'DD-MM-YYYY HH24:MI:SS' into the Date Format field. Save and close the dialog.
Views: 1133 Maruti AIR Tech
NLS_LANG.avi
 
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oracle language problems with Arabic
Views: 4384 vaguezoro
Software Globalization: Discussions with the Developer
 
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Another in a series of discussions with Sergiusz Wolicki, Database Globalization Architect at Oracle Corporation Do you have questions about internationalizing your Oracle Database applications, configuring globalization (NLS) settings in the database, or migrating the database character set to Unicode with the DMU utility? Do you want to know the various datetime data types or do you want to understand why you see all these funny characters on the screen in place of the expected non-English data? To find an answer, just join our session and ask -- we can answer most database globalization questions right away and we will be happy to search for an answer to the remaining ones. Within the limits of our expertise, we will also try to answer globalization questions about products other than Oracle Database. AskTOM Office Hours offers free, monthly training and tips on how to make the most of Oracle Database, from Oracle product managers, developers and evangelists. https://asktom.oracle.com/ Oracle Developers portal: https://developer.oracle.com/ Sign up for an Oracle Cloud trial: https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/tryit
Views: 58 Oracle Developers
CHANGING THE CHARACTER SET TO AL32UTF8
 
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By using these steps you can change the oracle database character set to AL32UTF8
Views: 31223 venkatesh sankala
113- Oracle SQL 12c: Managing Data in Different Time Zones 1
 
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EXAM 1Z0-061 EXAM 1Z0-071 •Time Zones. •Timestamp Data type •timestamp with time zone •timestamp with local time zone •V$TIMEZONE_NAMES •DBTIMEZONE •SESSIONTIMEZONE •current_date •current_timestamp •Localtimestamp •alter session set time_zone •Extract expression •TZ_OFFSET •from_tz •to_timestamp •to_yminterval •to_dsinterval
Views: 2020 khaled alkhudari
Software Globalization and Oracle Database
 
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Another in a series of discussions with Sergiusz Wolicki, Database Globalization Architect at Oracle Corporation. Do you have questions about internationalizing your Oracle Database applications, configuring globalization (NLS) settings in the database, or migrating the database character set to Unicode with the DMU utility? Do you want to know the various datetime data types or do you want to understand why you see all these funny characters on the screen in place of the expected non-English data? To find an answer, just join our session and ask -- we can answer most database globalization questions right away and we will be happy to search for an answer to the remaining ones. Within the limits of our expertise, we will also try to answer globalization questions about products other than Oracle Database. AskTOM Office Hours offers free, monthly training and tips on how to make the most of Oracle Database, from Oracle product managers, developers and evangelists. https://asktom.oracle.com/ Oracle Developers portal: https://developer.oracle.com/ Sign up for an Oracle Cloud trial: https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/tryit
Views: 55 Oracle Developers
114- Oracle SQL 12c: Managing Data in Different Time Zones 2
 
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•Time Zones. •Timestamp Data type •timestamp with time zone •timestamp with local time zone •V$TIMEZONE_NAMES •DBTIMEZONE •SESSIONTIMEZONE •current_date •current_timestamp •Localtimestamp •alter session set time_zone •Extract expression •TZ_OFFSET •from_tz •to_timestamp •to_yminterval •to_dsinterval
Views: 2392 khaled alkhudari
Ask TOM Office Hours: Loading CSV Data
 
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Held on April 12 2018 Chris discusses methods for creating auto-increment primary keys and loading CSV data into Oracle Database. The CSV options SQL*Loader, external tables and using SQL Developer. Start - slides discussing the above 17:00 - handling implicit string-to-date conversions via NLS parameters 20:12 - SQL Developer import/export options 22:57 - Dynamic CSV to columns converter using Polymorphic Table Functions AskTOM Office Hours offers free, monthly training and tips on how to make the most of Oracle Database, from Oracle product managers, developers and evangelists. https://asktom.oracle.com/ https://developer.oracle.com/ https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/tryit music: bensound.com
Views: 318 Oracle Developers
Oracle DBTIMEZONE Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-timezone-functions/ The Oracle DBTIMEZONE function returns the database timezone offset of the database. It returns it in the format of +/- TZH:TZM, or the time zone region name. It’s useful to know what timezone the database is in when working with dates and different time zones, as it can impact the queries you write. The syntax for this function is quite simple: DBTIMEZONE There are no parameters - just the function name. You can’t actually change the timezone of the database using this function. It uses the timezone of the operating system of the server the database runs on. It’s similar to the SESSIONTIMEZONE function, but that function returns the timezone of your session and not the database server. It’s also similar to the SYSTIMESTAMP function, but that function returns the date, time, and timezone of the database, where DBTIMEZONE just returns the timezone. For more information about the Oracle DBTIMEZONE function, including all of the SQL shown in this video and the examples, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-timezone-functions/
Views: 158 Database Star
Session6 Data type in Oracle
 
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Session 6: Datatypes In Oracle   ALPHABET           : A-Z , a-z NUMBER              : 0-9 (with precision and scale) DATE / Temporal  : any Date and time (Hours, Minutes, Seconds, Mili-seconds, Timestamp, Timezone etc)   Alphabet + Number = Alphanumeric Data                                     = String / CHARACTER Datatype Category Number                    =  Numeric Datatype Category Date                         = Date Datatype Category 1. CHARACTER Datatype: CHAR, VARCHAR, NCHAR: CHAR is fixed length datatype and VARCHAR is Variable length datatype to store character data. i.e. A-Z , a-z , 0-9 , all keyboard characters etc. The default size is 1 character and it can store maximum up to 2000 bytes. Example : EName, EmpID, PassportNo, SSN, etc. EName CHAR(10) := ‘TOM’; wastage of 7 space after the string EName VARCHAR(10) := ‘TOM’; Spaces can be Reuse which left after the string NCHAR additionally handles NLS(National Language Support). Oracle supports a reliable Unicode datatype through NCHAR , NVARCHAR2 , and NCLOB  VARCHAR2, NVARCHAR2: These are Variable length datatype. VARCHAR2 handles alphanumeric character string whereas NVARCHAR2 handles alphanumeric character string with NLS(National Language Support). The default size is 1 character and it can store maximum up to 4000 bytes.   LONG:  Variable length string.  (Maximum size: 2 GB - 1) Only one LONG column is allowed per table. RAW:    Variable length binary string (Maximum size 2000 bytes) LONG RAW: Variable length binary string (Maximum size 2GB) 2. NUMERIC Datatype: NUMBER: It stores Numeric values and performs numeric calculations. NUMBER,   NUMBER(n),   NUMBER(p,s) It stores Numbers up to 38 digits of precision. SeqNo NUMBER;                     1, 123, 12345678 EmpID NUMBER(4);                 1, 123, 1234 Sal NUMBER(7,2);                     23456.78 , 123.45 — correction in video: Sal NUMBER(a7,2); which is wrong please ignore. 1234567 can be a type of NUMBER, NUMBER(7), NUMBER(7,0) It can store both integer and floating point numbers NUMERIC(p,s) FLOAT:   Ex:  EmpSal FLOAT;    FLOAT(7)       Decimal Points allowed DEC(p,s), DECIMAL(p,s) , REAL, DOUBLE PRECISION INTEGER:   Ex:  SSN INTEGER;       Decimal Points are not allowed INT, SMALLINT 3. DATE Datatype: DATE: It stores DATE(Date, Month, Year) and Time(Hour, Minute, Second, AM/PM) and performs calculations with such data. Default DATE format in Oracle is “DD-MON-YY” Based on "Gregorian calendar" where the date ranges from “JAN 1 4712 BC” to “DEC 31 9999 AD” doj DATE;    “18-MAR-2010 12:30:00 PM” TIMESTAMP:    It can store all parameters as DATE datatype and additionally it can have “Fraction of seconds” and TIMESTAMP WITH TIMEZONE / TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIMEZONE. Range from 0-9 digits, the default size is 6. 4. LOB Datatype: LOB: “Large Object” data. It can store pictures, motion pictures, Textfiles etc. CLOB: “Character Large Object” is used to store structured information like a text file with a specific file format. BLOB: “Binary Large Object” is used to store Un-structured information like Image, JPEG files, MPEG files etc. BFILE: “Binary File” is used to store the pointer to a specific file / Just store the location of a file. Maximum size: (4 GB - 1) * DB_BLOCK_SIZE initialization parameter (8 TB to 128 TB) Extra Information: NCLOB : It supports all the character set supported by CLOB and additionally it handles NLS(National Language Support ) Maximum size: (4 GB - 1) * DB_BLOCK_SIZE initialization parameter (8 TB to 128 TB) ROWID and UROWID(optional size) Datatype: contains fixed length Binary data. BBBBBBB.RRRR.FFFFF combination of BLOCK-ROW-DATABASE FILE Physical and Logical ROWID Upcoming Session: Session 7: Populating Data into Tables(INSERT Statement): Inserting data into all columns of a table Inserting data into Required columns of a table Inserting NULL value into a table Inserting Special Values(USER / SYSDATE) into a table Supplying data at runtime(using & and &&) THANK YOU :)
Views: 368 Prabhat Sahu
Program Initialization Scan
 
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Physiospect
Views: 1572 pauloaaccsantos
00- Arabic Language Support: NLS_LANG
 
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Description
Views: 9136 Taher Alraboee
Using an inline view in an sql statement in SQL / PLSQL
 
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Using an inline view in an sql statement in SQL/PLSQL
Views: 2627 Subhroneel Ganguly
Oracle Tutroial - Point in time recovery restore sql flashback part -2
 
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In this video i'm going to show you how to use traditional point in time recovery in oracle step by step.
Views: 1092 OCP Technology
Creating JDeveloper Database Connections
 
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Learn how to create database connections using jDeveloper in this free video tutorial from http://www.fireboxtraining.com. We use jDeveloper in our Introduction to Java Training Class. https://www.fireboxtraining.com/java-programming-training. Discover more about learning programming for business at https://www.fireboxtraining.com/
Views: 16475 Firebox Training
Oracle SQL Tutorial 30 - UTF-8 and UTF-16 Character Sets
 
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A few videos ago we discussed UTF-8 and UTF-16 encoding, but when we are working with a database we do not worry about encodings as much as we do character sets. That's because a specific character set is going to have a specific encoding. The reason I am making this video is to introduce you to the most common character sets and to teach you the differences. That’s because as we go into the national character sets we need to understand the information taught in this video. So the first character set I am going to teach you about is AL32UTF8. AL32UTF8 is a character set that uses the uff-8 encoding and each character can take up to 4 bytes with the utf-8 encoding. There is another character set (not encoding) called utf8 (no hyphen) which is also encoded with UTF-8. This can be a little confusing because UTF8 is the name of an encoding and a character set, but bear with me. Both of these character sets are UTF-8 encoded, but UTF8 uses an older version of UTF-8 encoding. Generally, they work about the same, but the way certain characters are stored is slightly different, specifically way certain characters are stored is slightly different, specifically what are known as supplementary characters, which take up 4 bytes. The max size for a UTF8 character set is 3 bytes, as they do not directly support the supplementary characters as 4 bytes but instead store them across 2 groups of 3 bytes each. Oracle recommends that you use AL32UTF8 for all future development instead of the archaic UTF8 character set. There is another character set that you should know about, and that is AL16UTF16, which uses the UTF-16 encoding. Watch my video over UTF-8 and UTF-16 to learn more about UTF-16. Lastly, there is a character set known as UTFE, which uses an encoding known as UTF-EBCDIC. This is like a super archaic character set, and I'm not even going to talk about it. I thought I would at least mention it as it is going to come up a bit in the next video's topic. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 7662 Caleb Curry
How to Set Environment Variables in Linux
 
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Follow this tutorial to learn how to set shell environment variables in a Linux operating system like Ubuntu. Don't forget to check out our site http://howtech.tv/ for more free how-to videos! http://youtube.com/ithowtovids - our feed http://www.facebook.com/howtechtv - join us on facebook https://plus.google.com/103440382717658277879 - our group in Google+ In this tutorial, you will learn how to set environment variables in linux. Linux based operating systems use bash shell. The shell environment variables are used for several purposes, from storing data, storing software configurations, set terminal settings, and changing shell environment. The environment variables are normally created by the operating system during installation, or by different software as per the required need. Apart from that, in linux, to set environment variables, we first need to access the terminal application. That's because the user has the privilege to add, edit, and remove different variables at will. Step # 1 -- All variables on terminal In linux, to set environment variables we first need to access shell environment variables. For that, we will need to open the terminal by searching for it in the applications menu, or selecting it from the dock on the left. Once the terminal is opened up, to check for all environment variables, type the set command and press enter. This will list all the environment variables stored in the shell. Step # 2 -- One variable at a time The amount of these variables can become a very long list and locating one specific variable can become a tough task. Fortunately Linux allows us to display the value of one shell variable by using the echo command along with the name of the variable. This makes the task very easy. Step # 3 -- Changing a variable Now, to add or modify an environment variable, we can use the export command followed by the name of the variable and the values that go with it. Multiple values for a variable need to be separated by a colon. The colon indicates to the operating system that one value has ended and another has begun. The variables can be created and removed from the shell easily, and can be done whenever required. But changing important variables may mess with the operating system's functionalities so it's important to be careful. And that's basically all you need to know for how to set environment variables in Linux.
52. Design - Designing for Internationalization - Character encoding
 
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The author's recommendation: the ADF Architecture TV channel is a training course to extend customers' knowledge in ADF, it is not a marketing or promotional exercise from Oracle Corporation. If you've arrived on this episode by Googling in, please make sure to look at all of the content on the TV channel rather than taking this episode as a standalone topic. This episode: The best internationalized applications can be ruined by improper character encoding. In this week's episode of the ADF Architecture TV series with Frederic Desbiens, you will learn how to preserve the integrity of both data and on-screen text through proper encoding. You will also see where the main encoding settings are located in the JDeveloper IDE. Like to know more? Check out: Watch the previous episode: - Design - Designing for Internationalization - User Interface Design - http://youtu.be/ARx0hRNGfcU Watch the next episode: - Design - Designing for Internationalization - Resource Bundles - http://youtu.be/Q8fS7axk6Ho Subscribe to the channel: - http://bit.ly/adftvsub See the episode index: - ADF Architecture Square - http://bit.ly/adfarchsquare
Views: 1184 ADF Architecture TV
Setting up a User's Timezone
 
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About Decisions | http://www.decisions.com Decisions is the finest workflow automation SaaS. Our graphically configurable platform (http://decisions.com/platform) gives users the ability to both create new, and enhance existing applications. The Decisions team has been working together for over a decade delivering an experience that gives more control and configuration ability to administrators. Specifically, the platform allows for the creation of applications that can be configured by non-programmers in a way that is safe, visible, and flexible. This mission has driven the Decisions team to create numerous technologies in use today at some of the world's largest and most innovative companies. For more information, visit Decisions.com.